We’ve spent the past four installments in this series putting together a System Center Orchestrator runbook workflow to call into PowerShell to call Tintri Automation Toolkit cmdlets to do a bunch of stuff.

The stuff that it’s doing is solving a real business need for us — we want our developers to be able to test their code against a current copy of production data. Dump and restore operations are very expensive and error prone, so we’re taking advantage of Tintri’s SyncVM functionality to handle the data synchronisation for us. As we’ll see, this is going to take less than a minute to perform!

In this article, we’ll walk through executing this runbook and show how easy it makes the task. This simplicity makes it a great candidate for a task that can be delegated to someone with less in-depth knowledge (or access to) the cloud infrastructure. This is a big step forward toward self-service.

Orchestrator Web Console

If we now point our web browser at port 82 of our Orchestrator server (for example, http://scorch-2016.vmlevel.com:82/), you should be presented with the Orchestrator Web Console and you should see our new Runbook.

scorch-runbooks

Select the runbook and click the Start Runbook button.

scorch-start

It will prompt you for the required input — simply the name of the developer’s virtual machine. It doesn’t request any information about the VMstore that the VM is stored on, it doesn’t ask for the production VM name, it doesn’t ask which snapshot to sync from and it doesn’t ask which virtual disks to synchronise. All of that is taken care of inside the runbook. This drastically reduces the number of places we could accidentally mess something up when we’re in a hurry or if we delegate this task to someone else.

Should something go wrong with the destination VM as part of this process, the SyncVM process we’re using takes a safety snapshot automatically, so at worst, we can easily roll it back.

We’ll enter our VM name (vmlevel-devel) and kick off the runbook job.

scorch-vmname

Next we’ll click on the Jobs tab and should see a running job.

scorch-jobs

If the job doesn’t have an hour glass (indicating it’s running) or a green tick (indicating success), it’s worth checking that the Orchestrator Runbook service is started on your runbook servers (check your Services applet). I’ve noticed that at times it doesn’t start correctly by itself despite being set to be automatically started:

scorch-services

After a little while (it takes about 45 seconds in my lab), hit refresh and the job should have succeeded. At that point, click on View Instances and then View Details to view the details of the job.

scorch-jobdetails

If we click on the Activity Details tab and scroll down, we can see the parameters of the Run .Net Script activity that calls our PowerShell code. If you look closely, you’ll see the variables we have defined. This especially includes out TraceLog variable, which you can see in the above output gives us a very detailed run-down of the process executed.

Given that this has succeeded, we’ve achieved our goal. Our developer VM has our developer code and OS on it, but has a copy of the latest production data snapshot. The whole process took less than 60 seconds and the developer is now up and running with recent production data — all without costly dumps and restores.

Try it for yourself and see.

[Ovation image by Joi Ito and used unmodified under CC2.0]

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2 thoughts on “Orchestration for Enterprise Cloud part 5

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