What does Enterprise Cloud have in common with an all-you-can-eat buffet?

Delegation and Self-Service

As well as automating tasks to be run on a regular schedule to avoid manual handling, many tasks are being automated to allow the delegation of executing certain tasks to other humans.

Consider the case where you have 10 VDI desktops deployed. As common tasks come up, such as restoring files from snapshots, diagnosing performance issues or provisioning new desktops, it’s easy to jump in and take care of matters by hand. Take that number to 1000 and you’re likely going to start to see issues maintaining those by hand as you scale. Get to 10,000 or more and it’s an entirely different class of problem.

This doesn’t just apply to VDI — DevOps deployments and Enterprise server farms are seeing the same kinds of challenges as they scale too.

In order to scale past a few systems, you need to start to delegate some number of tasks to someone else. Whether that be a helpdesk team of some kind, or a developer or application owner, or even potentially the end user of a VDI desktop.

However, delegation and self-service are not just a case of dumping a bunch of tech in front of folks and wishing them luck. In most cases, these folks won’t have the technical domain knowledge required to safely manage their portion of infrastructure. We need to identify the tasks that they need to be able to perform and package those up safely and succinctly.

Buffet!

Consider a restaurant with an all-you-can-eat buffet. One of the nice ones — we’re professionals here. Those buffets don’t have a pile of raw ingredients, knives and hotplates, yet they’re most definitely still self-service.

You’re given a selection of dishes to choose from. They’ve all been properly prepared and safely presented, so that you don’t need to worry about the food preparation yourself. There is the possibility of making some bad decisions (roast beef and custard), but you can’t really go far enough to actually do yourself any great harm.

They do this to scale. More patrons with fewer overhead costs, such as staff.

DIY Self-Service

As we deploy some kind of delegation or self-service infrastructure, we need to:

  1. Come up with a menu of tasks that we wish to allow others to perform,
  2. Work out the safety constraints around putting them in the hands of others, and
  3. Probably still having staff to pour the bottomless mimosas instead of simply a tap.

We did introduce these two things in previous series’ of articles. In particular, #1 is a case of listing and defining one or more business problems, as we saw in the automation series.. For example, users that accidentally delete or lose an important file, might need a way to retrieve files from a snapshot from a few days ago. #2 above is referring to taking and validating very limited user input. In the restore example above, we’d probably only allow the user to specify the day that contains the snapshot they’re looking for and maybe the name of their VM.

Public Cloud

Self-service and autonomy are one of the things that Public Cloud have brought to the table at a generic level. By understanding the specifics of your own Enterprise, you can not only meet, but exceed that Public Cloud agility within your own data centre. This can also be extended to seamlessly include Public Cloud for the hybrid case.

Next Steps

As with each of these series, we’re starting here with a high level overview and will follow that up with an illustrative example over the coming articles. We’ll build on what we’ve learned in those previous series and we’ll again use the common System Center suite to get some hands-on experience. As always, the concepts and workflow apply quite well to tools other than System Center too.

To summarise, delegation and self-service are essential for most organisations as they scale. When used to safely allow autonomy of other groups, it can save you and your team significantly.

[Buffet picture by Kenming Wang and used unmodified under SA2.0]

 

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